2012-2013 U.S. History
Question of the Day Archive



"WPA Scene" by Carl Nyquist, 1937
(Source: Wikimedia Commons--public domain)

The following multiple-choice questions are arranged in rough chronological order
and may be used by teachers or students for any purpose.



Topic
Topic
Topic
Topic
Topic
Topic
Topic
Topic
Topic
Topic
The First Americans
Indian Cultures
Before Columbus
Mexican Indian Peoples
Pre-Columbian Cultures
Roanoke
Transatlantic Contact
Early English Settlers
Self-government
Puritans
Women in Colonial Virginia
Headright System
Bacon's Rebellion
Glorious Revolution
Catholics in the Colonies
The Great Awakening
Enlightenment
Benjamin Franklin
Colonial Slavery
The Backcountry
French & Indian War
Revolutionary Ideology
Imperial Attitudes
Sugar Act
Parliament's Power
Declaration of Independence
Battles of the Revolution
Annapolis Convention
Compromises at the Convention
Constitutional Provisions
Powers of Congress
Northwest Ordinance
Treaty of Paris
Newburgh Address
The Federalist
Ratification
America & the French Revolution
Hamilton's Financial Plans
Washington's Farewell Address
Election of 1796
Sedition Act
Quasi-War
Louisiana Purchase
Federalists and Louisiana Purchase
Aaron Burr
Anglo-American Relations
Lewis & Clark Expedition
Second Great Awakening
War of 1812
Hartford Convention
Political Parties
Marshall Court
Factory System
Lowell System
Panic of 1819
National Road
Election of 1824
Jackson's Election
First Thanksgiving
Worcester v. Georgia
Whig Party
Jackson & Privilege
Patronage
Nullification
Religion & Reform
Mormonism
Education
Reform
Hudson River School
Texas Independence Fight
Expansionism
Annexation of Texas
Opposition to the Mexican -American War
"54°40' or Fight"
Wilmot Proviso
Douglas and Slavery
Free Soil Party
1850s Events
Anti-Immigrant Attitudes
Republican Party
Lincoln's 1st Inaugural Address
Anaconda Plan
Domestic Civil War Actions
Emancipation Proclamation
New York City Riots
Election of 1864
Civil War Problems
Black Troops
1865 Events
Johnson's Impeachment
Radical Republicans
Freedmen's Bureau
Martin Luther King, Jr.